e348fabc 7bea 471a 8728 3568761012a2 Dog Argentino

Dogo Argentino

Loyal / Protective / Affectionate

The dogo is sizable, athletic, quick, and intelligent. It’s an elite, instinctive sporting dog with an affectionate side for a master that can establish themselves as the alpha. These beasts have a strong prey instinct and potential for aggression. Most of the time though, the dogo is happy and sweet family-friendly pup.

e348fabc 7bea 471a 8728 3568761012a2 Dog Argentino

Health

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Personality

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Lifetime Care

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Breed Profile

Height

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  • Males: 24-26.5 inches
  • Females: 24-25.5 inches

Weight

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  • Males: 80-100 lbs
  • Females: 80-100 lbs

Lifetime

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  • 9-15 years

Health Risk

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Glaucoma

What is it?

Glaucoma is an eye condition caused by fluid build-up that increases eye pressure.

% of Dogs affected:

Unknown

Clinical signs:

Swollen eye, cloudy or red eyes, fluid discharge, reduced appetite and energy, eye discomfort, impaired visual awareness, eye rubbing.

Treatment:

Medications to drain eye fluid, medications for pain management, medical therapy (long term), surgery.

Other risks:

Prompt treatment is crucial, permanent blindness or the need to remove the eye surgically could occur in severe cases or due to delayed treatment must be monitored after treatment.

Amount a Spot accident & illness plan would cover*
*Hypothetical reimbursement examples illustrate reimbursement of an eligible vet bill at the noted reimbursement rate, assuming the annual deductible had already been met.

Average Vet Bill

$3000

Amount a Spot accident & illness plan would cover*


90% = $2700

80% = $2400

70% = $2100

*Hypothetical reimbursement examples illustrate reimbursement of an eligible vet bill at the noted reimbursement rate, assuming the annual deductible had already been met.

Personality

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Loyal

Dog owners will find them fiercely loyal to the pack with proper training.

Protective

It will guard your family loyally and bravely in any situation.

Affectionate

These dogs are affectionate with family and playful.

Athletic

Intense periods of exercise are best, and your dogo will likely try to turn any exercise session into an intense one if it isn’t already.

Lifetime Care

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Coat

Dogo Argentinos have a short, smooth, white coat.

Colors

White. No markings are officially recognized, but black spots are common.

Hypoallergenic

No, dogo Argentinos are not hypoallergenic.

Grooming

Occasional brushing. Regular nail trimming. Dental cleaning, ear cleaning, brushing

Training

Training, including lots of socialization, is needed to keep their instincts in check.

Lifetime Care Cost:

Approximately $21700

Dogo Argentino: Dog Breed Information Guide

Most people have heard of bulldogs, golden retrievers, poodles, and more popular breeds, but the dogo Argentino is a breed that flies largely under the radar.

This AKC miscellaneous class Argentinian dog breed has only recently spread from South America to other areas, including the United States.

Today, our Spot Pet Insurance dog breed guide is all about this beautiful, powerful breed. We’re talking about a wide array of factors and best practices to ensure you and your new dogo Argentino thrive.  

While the dogo Argentino isn’t the most popular breed, it is nonetheless a beautiful and impressive animal that can make a great fit for an experienced owner and their family.

As a pack hunting dog bred to pursue big game such as wild boar and puma, the dogo is sizable, athletic, quick, and intelligent. It’s an elite, instinctive sporting dog with an affectionate side for a master that can establish themselves as the alpha.

Read on to learn about the dogo’s history, temperament, training, exercise needs, and more!

Where do dogo Argentinos come from?

Understanding the dogo Argentino’s history is the foundation of understanding the breed.

The man responsible for the dogo Argentino was only 18 years old when his breeding efforts began. Antonio Nores Martinez was an Argentine (as the breed’s name might imply) with an intense devotion to his craft.

Dr. Martinez bred the dogo Argentino primarily from the Fighting Dog of Cordoba, a breed that is now extinct. The physical qualities of the breed were impressive, but the doctor sought a dog that could cooperate with a pack and wanted to hunt more than fight.

Since sport hunters in Argentina preferred using small blades over firearms, they needed pups who could find, chase, and hold down big game such as wild boars and pumas. The new breed would need size, strength, exceptional stamina, a great sense of smell, and speed to chase down fast prey.

The dogo Argentino was carefully mixed with several breeds to achieve the perfect traits. Pointers, Great Danes, Bull Terriers , Pyrenean Mastiffs, Boxers, and Bulldogs were all involved.

The dogo Argentino was mostly found in Argentina until the mid-20th century, when it expanded across South America to a lesser extent.

Only recently has the breed found its way to other parts of the world, including the United States, where it was only recognized officially by the American Kennel Club in 2020.

What are the potential health conditions for dogo Argentinos?

For such a large dog, the dogo Argentino is quite healthy in general. There are always certain predispositions with every breed, though.

In this breed’s case, pigment-related deafness is the big one. About 10% of dogo Argentino suffer from it.

Glaucoma and Laryngeal paralysis can also become a problem for some dogos. When you find a dogo Argentino and want to make it a family member, check with the breeder or shelter for health test results.

Other potential health issues:

Hypothyroidism

Hip dysplasia

Personality of the dogo Argentino

How well do dogo Argentinos get along with their owners?

Like most dogs, the dogo Argentino has great potential to be a family companion. Dog owners will find them fiercely loyal to the pack with proper training. However, these dogs were also bred to hunt independently, so don’t expect an overly clingy companion.

Are dogo Argentinos aggressive towards strangers?

As sporting dogs bred for hunting, these beasts have a strong prey instinct and potential for aggression. Most of the time, the dogo is happy and sweet, but strangers and small animals or large animals of the same gender can raise concern.

Expect a dogo Argentino to be cautious around strangers, both human and animal, with special sensitivity to the presence of smaller animals.

Training, including lots of socialization, is needed to keep their instincts in check.

Do dogo Argentinos make good guard dogs?

A dogo Argentino can make an excellent, if quiet, watchdog. It will guard your family loyally and bravely in any situation. While the breed isn’t usually very vocal, their physical presence is often enough to deter intruders.

Will a dogo Argentino be a fun dog to have around?

These dogs are affectionate with family and playful, but they are also a lot of work. Those who can handle the breed’s training needs and provide lots of exercise are in for an enjoyable and rewarding pet parent journey.

Are dogo Argentinos good with children?

Dogo Argentinos are loyal and affectionate to their human family, regardless of the human’s age or size. Children who are not part of the family should be slowly and carefully introduced.

How are dogo Argentinos with other dogs?

Interacting with other dogs is a challenge for this breed. Due to the breed’s high prey drive, smaller animals such as cats and small dogs can be an exceptional circumstance. In general, dogo Argentinos do best without other animals in their home.

How to care for a dogo Argentino

What is a dogo Argentino’s coat like?

Dogo Argentinos have a short, smooth, white coat. No markings are officially recognized, but black spots are common (and very cute), even if “officially” considered a flaw. Some owners even prefer these spots as they reduce the risk of pigment-related deafness.

How are dogo Argentinos with other dogs?

Interacting with other dogs is a challenge for this breed. Due to the breed’s high prey drive, smaller animals such as cats and small dogs can be an exceptional circumstance. In general, dogo Argentinos do best without other animals in their home.

Are dogo Argentinos hypoallergenic?

No, dogo Argentinos are not hypoallergenic.

How often do dogo Argentinos have to be groomed?

You may wish to brush their fur once every week or so. The shedding season occurs twice a year, so brushing is even more important during those times. Their nails do grow quickly, so be sure to clip them regularly. Dental cleaning, ear cleaning, brushing, and bathing at moderate intervals should be plenty to keep your pooch hygienic and healthy.

What is the lifetime care cost of a dogo Argentino?

$21700

How to be the best pet parent for a dogo Argentino?

There are many benefits to this breed, but there are also challenges to be aware of.

At Spot Pet Insurance, we’re happy to walk alongside you with lots of informative resources available through our Blogbowl!

How much does a dogo Argentino dog or puppy cost?

Adoption fee (Purebred dogo Argentino puppies): $1,000-5,000

Yearly care cost (first year): $3,000

Yearly care cost (following years): $1,700

Basic training and behavior etiquette for your dogo Argentino

The dogo Argentino is not for timid owners when it comes to training, though it is incredibly rewarding once this powerful dog is well trained.

Here are some tips to help with the process:

  1. Because the dogo grows so large, training from a young age is recommended. Innate independence and stubbornness in the breed also make training more difficult the older the dog becomes.
  2. Physical punishment is not the best way to get the desired behavior from your dog. The key to training this breed is a firm demeanor with no inconsistency. Set strict boundaries and don’t make exceptions (even if they give you the puppy eyes), or your dogo Argentino may let their instincts creep in and chase or wander.
  3. A core part of properly training a dogo Argentino is socialization, which can help with their reluctance towards strangers and prey drive.
  4. While there are challenges to training this breed, they are highly intelligent and pick up on training quickly. They can become an obedient, well-behaved companion with consistency and the right approach.

What types of foods should dogo Argentino never eat?

Certain foods should be kept away from all dogs, regardless of breed. You can find examples of common foods that are unhealthy or toxic for dogs below:

  • Meat bones
  • Dairy
  • Sweets
  • Grapes
  • Raisins
  • Apple seeds & cores
  • Caffeine
  • Alcohol
  • Chocolate
  • Peaches

Exercising tips to keep your dogo Argentino staying fit and healthy

Dogo Argentinos require frequent exercise and mental stimulation. This is typical of sporting or working dogs, especially large breeds like the dogo.

Intense periods of exercise are best, and your dogo will likely try to turn any exercise session into an intense one if it isn’t already. This means they will bound around with speed and vigor and might not show the kind of restraint and grace particularly young or old owners may need. Fit, active owners will enjoy an equally active doggy play partner.

Remember the importance of secure boundaries while your dogo Argentino runs and plays. Be sure that the potential for escape (or for a stranger entering your dogo’s territory) is minimal, or ideally none.

Besides running and walking, tug-of-war, fetch, swimming, and disc catching are other fun ways to keep your dogo Argentino occupied.

If agility, rally, and similar sports catch your fancy, consider training this high-energy dog in those fields. They will enjoy having such a strong sense of purpose — and you’ll be able to handle their energy levels!

Dogo Argentino life stages

Puppy: 0 – 19 months

Adult: 19 months – 8 years

Senior: 8 – 15 years

Here at Spot Pet Insurance, we do our best to provide helpful dog info. We care deeply about your dog’s health and want to be with you every step of the way. For other helpful info about pets, check out our Spot Pet Insurance webpage! Here we provide you with educational materials that can help you with the best foods, toys, safety, and care tips for your dog. We also offer personalized pet insurance plan options to help keep your dog protected in case of unexpected accidents and illnesses.