Lowchen Dog

Lowchen

Affectionate, Lively, Brave

The Löwchen or Little Lion Dog, has been a well-liked pet throughout Continental Europe for more than 500 years. It is stated that the non-shedding Löwchen is as friendly, vivacious, and courageous as a lion. Lowchen (single or plural) are diminutive canines that have big hearts.

Lowchen Dog

Health

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Personality

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Lifetime Care

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Breed Profile

Height

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  • 12-14 inches

Weight

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  • 15-17 lbs.

Lifetime

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  • 13 – 15 years

Health Risk

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Cataracts

What is it?: 

Canines get cataracts as they age, much like people do. An opaque layer forms on the eye’s lens that blocks light. Lowchen dog’s eyes contain water and proteins. Cataracts, which resemble clouds, are produced when proteins in the eye’s lens begin to collect together. Proteins start to build up and finally completely cover the lens. Cataracts can appear suddenly or develop gradually over time, leaving your dog completely blind.

% of dogs affected

20-25% (75-80% of dogs develop cataracts if they have diabetes)

Clinical signs

  • Cloudy pupils in either or both eyes.
  • Scared to jump or climb.
  • Clumsiness.
  • Reluctance to enter dimly lit areas.
  • Scratching of eyes.
  • Changes in eye color or pupils.

Treatment

There is just one known treatment that can stop a cataract from forming in Little Lion Dogs, once it has started; surgery. The main goal is to restore functional eyesight to Lowchens following cataract surgery.

Surgery is used to remove cataracts while under general anesthetic. The lens is taken out and replaced by a plastic or acrylic lens by the veterinarian. Depending on the situation, the veterinary ophthalmologist may need to operate on just one eye or both.

Average Vet Bill

$5000

Amount a Spot accident & illness plan would cover*


90% = $4500

80% = $4000

70% = $3500

*Hypothetical reimbursement examples illustrate reimbursement of an eligible vet bill at the noted reimbursement rate, assuming the annual deductible had already been met.

Patellar Luxation

What is it?: 

An out-of-place or dislocated state is referred to as luxating. A luxating patella causes a pop or displacement in the kneecap. In dogs, patellar luxation is a common orthopedic issue. Medial luxation is diagnosed more frequently than lateral luxation in small-breed dogs.

% of dogs affected

7-9%

Clinical signs

  • Limping.
  • Walking abnormally.
  • An inability to bend over.
  • Whining when extending the leg.
  • Hesitant to run.
  • Swelling in legs.

Treatment

Depending on the severity of the condition, a dog with a luxating patella may require both conservative medicinal treatment and surgery. Most grade I and grade II patients are treated with analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs, weight management, and exercise restriction. Physical therapy can help your dog restore muscle strength and gradually return to normal activity, which is why it may be beneficial in this situation. Surgery may be beneficial for certain dogs with grade II arthritis who have significant discomfort from cartilage degeneration and significant lameness. This will enhance their standard of living. Grade III and grade IV patellar luxation can result in severe lameness and pain, and surgery is frequently advised.

Dog patella luxation surgery may be performed to treat bone or soft tissue disorders. Whatever method is used, the main objective is to realign the knee’s supporting tissues so that the kneecap may move normally and remain in the femur’s groove. Typical surgical techniques include:

  • Techniques to make the area where the kneecap rests on the femur wider.
  • Lateralizing the joint where the shinbone and kneecap meet.
  • Stabilizing the knee joint’s soft tissue support system.

Average Vet Bill

$5000

Amount a Spot accident & illness plan would cover*


90% = $4500

80% = $4000

70% = $3500

*Hypothetical reimbursement examples illustrate reimbursement of an eligible vet bill at the noted reimbursement rate, assuming the annual deductible had already been met.

Personality

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Affectionate

When it comes to their owners, Lowchens never hesitate to shower love and affection towards them.

Lively

Litlle Lion Dogs can be quite active and full of energy when they are well-fed on attention and love.

Brave

Lowchens bravery is the epitome of the phrase “Don’t judge a book by their cover”.

Lifetime Care

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Coat & Colors

The Lowchen has a thick, long, fairly wavy coat that is velvety to the touch. There is no particular colour or combination; they come in all colours and combinations.

Hypoallergenic

Yes.

Grooming

Litlle Lion dogs don’t shed much, but frequent grooming is still necessary to keep mats and tangles from forming. Lowchens will require routine cutting to keep their coat from getting untidy because it grows swiftly as well.

Training

Löwchens are a smart little breed, and they take to positive reinforcement training techniques very well. Litlle Lion Dogs are eager to please their owners and pick up commands and tricks rapidly. The löwchen can occasionally act as a watchdog by barking frequently to alert.

Lowchen Origin

The löwchen’s unique name actually means “little lion” in German, which is why this breed is often affectionately referred to as the little lion dog. There are a number of competing ideas on the Lowchen’s ancestry, and the discussion is frequently rife with contention. According to one idea, the breed was developed in Northern Europe, which includes France, Belgium, and Germany. It is thought that the Little Lion Dogs may have been a founding breed for the Toy Poodle or that it may have been connected to the founding breed.

Regardless of where the breed came from, we do know that its main function was as a companion dog. It might have also served as a small alarm dog and a mouse hunter. We also know that the Lowchen were owned by people of all social classes and that they could be found in both farms and castles.

Lowchen Nutrition and Diet

Little Lion Dogs should be fed a high-quality, balanced, and sensible portion-controlled diet, just like all dogs. It’s simple to spoil your dog by giving them too many bad treats and leftovers from meals, or by just overfeeding them. One of the most prevalent health issues affecting dogs in the US is obesity, which has a number of other (more serious) consequences.

Lowchen Exercise 

Despite their diminutive size and desire for attention, löwchens are not merely lapdogs. They are a breed that is lively, inquisitive, and enthusiastic, therefore they will want some daily exercise as well as enough of stimulation in the home to keep them mentally engaged. They are renowned for enjoying and succeeding at agility, and dog puzzles will stimulate their minds. They can certainly exercise indoors (as well as outdoors) if their home is large enough for quick games of catch or other physical activity.

Conclusion

The Lowchen is a friendly and outgoing dog who is always a delight to be around. He is the live example of the adage that “wherever he is, is the coolest and most lovely place to be,” as he is constantly in a good mood. The Lowchen is spirited despite its small size. With his family, he enjoys spending time outdoors and will play catch for hours. The Lowchen is a sweet breed, and he sees everyone as his best friend, even little ones! The Lowchen is an outstanding family friend because of his amiable demeanor and playful nature.

No breed of dog is perfect. Lowchen can experience separation anxiety if his family members must depart for work or school since they get so attached to him. This syndrome may cause excessive and persistent barking, persistent door-scraping, or even destructive behavior. Long lengths of time should not be spent alone with the Lowchen.

Happy Mood and Health to your Doggo and lots of Love and Licks to you!

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