f86d6792 c2f7 4b68 8572 4d00d6512491 lhaso apso profile

Lhasa apso

Comic / Loyal / Confident

The Lhasa apso, also known as the lion dog, is a centuries-old breed. Lhasa apsos are well known for their very long hair that sweeps the ground as they walk and would hide their adorable faces if allowed. They make wonderful companions and could be a great addition to your family.

f86d6792 c2f7 4b68 8572 4d00d6512491 lhaso apso profile

Health

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Personality

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Lifetime Care

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Breed Profile

Height

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  • 9 – 11 Inches

Weight

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  • 80 – 150 lbs

Lifetime

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  • 12-15 Years

Health Risk

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Hip Dysplasia

What is it?

A genetic condition, hip dysplasia occurs when the ball and socket of the hip joint become malformed. It causes a grating in the joint, and it can make your pup very uncomfortable. There’s also a form of dysplasia that affects the elbows.

% Dogs affected:

Unknown

Clinical signs:

Swaying gait, avoids climbing stairs or jumping on furniture, lameness in the hind end, loss of muscle mass in the thighs and gaining more muscle in the shoulders, limping/stiffness, grating in the affected joint, smaller range of motion and activity, and pain.

Treatment:

Supplements, surgery, joint fluid modifiers, restricting exercise, weight loss, anti-inflammatory medication, and glucosamine.

Health risks:

Complications during surgery  & Loss of function in joint due to deterioration

Amount a Spot accident & illness plan would cover*
*Hypothetical reimbursement examples illustrate reimbursement of an eligible vet bill at the noted reimbursement rate, assuming the annual deductible had already been met.

Average Vet Bill

$2400

Amount a Spot accident & illness plan would cover*


90% = $2160

80% = $1920

70% = $1680

*Hypothetical reimbursement examples illustrate reimbursement of an eligible vet bill at the noted reimbursement rate, assuming the annual deductible had already been met.

Glaucoma

What is it?
Glaucoma is an eye condition that tends to be pretty painful. It can affect both humans and dogs, although it isn’t considered an contagious, interspecies disease. A dog must be genetically predisposed. Glaucoma occurs when there isn’t proper fluid drainage in the eye due to pressure.

% Dogs affected:
1.33% of the breed

Clinical signs:
Blinking, vision loss, redness in the white of the eyes, cloudiness in the eye, dilated pupil, eyeball recedes in the back of the head, degeneration of the eye (In more advanced cases), more pronounced vision in advanced cases, enlarged eyeball in severe instances.

Treatment:
Medication, surgery in extreme cases, draining fluid, freeze cells that produce the fluids, removing the eye.

Health risks:

Permanent loss of vision

Potential eye removal

Average Vet Bill

$1800

Amount a Spot accident & illness plan would cover*


90% = $1620

80% = $1440

70% = $1260

*Hypothetical reimbursement examples illustrate reimbursement of an eligible vet bill at the noted reimbursement rate, assuming the annual deductible had already been met.

Portosystemic shunt (PSS)

What is it?
Portosystemic shunt (PSS) is a disorder that affects your pup’s liver. The blood that is supposed to go to the liver instead goes around it, which means the liver can’t clean out toxins and can’t develop properly either.

% Dogs affected:
Unknown

Clinical signs:
Gastrointestinal issues like vomiting or diarrhea, difficulty urinating, stunted growth, seizures and other neurological issues, long recovery from anesthesia, fluid collecting in the intestine, and wobbly.

Treatment:
Surgery

Medications

Health risks:

N/A

Average Vet Bill

$3000

Amount a Spot accident & illness plan would cover*


90% = $2700

80% = $2400

70% = $2100

*Hypothetical reimbursement examples illustrate reimbursement of an eligible vet bill at the noted reimbursement rate, assuming the annual deductible had already been met.

Personality

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Comic  

In public, they are dignified and reserved, but they are engaging and sometimes funny in private. 

Loyal

They are very loyal and will love you and your family only, for life. 

Confident 

For little dogs, they have big personalities. They are confident and strong willed. 

Intelligent 

Their intelligence just adds to their strength of character. 

Friendly 

Although they may not warm to unknown humans, these lap dogs tend to be friendly with other dogs and pets. 

Lifetime Care

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Coat

They have a long, silky coat that usually reaches the floor. They shed minimally.

Colors

There are many colors although the most popular are white.

Hypoallergenic

Yes, Lhasa apsos are considered hypoallergenic dogs because they don’t lose tons of hair or have a shedding season.

Grooming

They need to be groomed daily so their fur doesn’t matt. Brushing and combing are both essential to keep their long coat free of tangles.

Training

The best way to train one of these pups is to use the reward system. It might also help to make it into a game so that they will be more inclined to cooperate.

Lifetime Care Cost:

Approximately $25910 (Reviews from dog breed-specific parents)

Lhasa Apso: Dog Breed Information Guide

Lhasa apsos are well known for their very long hair that sweeps the ground as they walk and would hide their adorable faces if allowed. They make wonderful companions and could be a great addition to your family. If you want to adopt a Lhasa apso, continue reading to learn more about them.

Lhasa apso: An introduction to the breed

 

The Lhasa apso, also known as the lion dog, is a centuries-old breed. This small dog is originally from the Himalayan Mountains in Tibet, where they lived in monasteries. They were frequently utilized as guard dogs for Tibetan Buddhist monasteries, and their barks would warn the monks of people coming to visit.

 

They made it to England in the early 1900s. Before getting the name Lhasa apso, they were called Lhasa terriers, and they were thought to be the same breed as the Tibetan terrier.

 

In the 1930s, the Lhasa apso made it to the United States. Soon, the Tibetan Breeds Association was founded, and they began to sort through the different Tibetan breeds. They recognized the Lhasa apso as its own breed.

 

Lhasa apsos arrived in America in 1930, after the 13th Dalai Lama, Thubten Gyatso, gave this tiny dog to an American naturalist named C. Suydam Cutting. The American Kennel Club (AKC) listed them as an official breed five years after they arrived in the United States. This ancient breed was initially placed in the terrier group, but in the mid-1900s, the AKC changed their position to the non-sporting group.

Lhasa apso: An introduction to the breed

 

The Lhasa apso, also known as the lion dog, is a centuries-old breed. This small dog is originally from the Himalayan Mountains in Tibet, where they lived in monasteries. They were frequently utilized as guard dogs for Tibetan Buddhist monasteries, and their barks would warn the monks of people coming to visit.

 

They made it to England in the early 1900s. Before getting the name Lhasa apso, they were called Lhasa terriers, and they were thought to be the same breed as the Tibetan terrier.

 

In the 1930s, the Lhasa apso made it to the United States. Soon, the Tibetan Breeds Association was founded, and they began to sort through the different Tibetan breeds. They recognized the Lhasa apso as its own breed.

 

Lhasa apsos arrived in America in 1930, after the 13th Dalai Lama, Thubten Gyatso, gave this tiny dog to an American naturalist named C. Suydam Cutting. The American Kennel Club (AKC) listed them as an official breed five years after they arrived in the United States. This ancient breed was initially placed in the terrier group, but in the mid-1900s, the AKC changed their position to the non-sporting group.

Other potential health risks

Purebred Lhasa apsos can have health problems like:

  • Kidney dysfunction
  • Patellar luxation, loose kneecaps.
  • Progressive retinal atrophy, which can cause blindness.
  • Distichiasis, which is where eyelashes grow in the wrong place.
  • Cherry eye, which is when a gland in the eye pops out a little.
  • Renal cortical hypoplasia, a kidney disorder.

 

What is the personality of the Lhasa apso like?

 

Are Lhasa apsos fond of their owners?

 

Lhasa apsos love their families very much. At home, they can be comedic. They are very loyal and will love you and your family only, for life. They are excellent companions

 

Are Lhasa apsos easygoing?

 

For little dogs, they have big personalities. They are confident and strong willed. Their intelligence just adds to their strength of character. They aren’t really aggressive, although they will bark to warn you if someone’s coming.

How easy is it to train a Lhasa apso?

 

Lhasa apsos are very intelligent creatures, so much so that they think they know what’s best. They are very stubborn, so you can’t really force them to learn tricks. They learn faster through reward systems such as treats, praise, or extra attention.

 

Are Lhasa apsos good with kids?

 

If you have a family with small children or friends with children who often visit, you may wonder whether the Lhasa apso will nip at children when trying to play with this little dog.

 

Children must always be taught to be gentle with pets, so they won’t pull at the Lhasa apso’s hair. However, these dogs are good with children and love to play with them.

How do apsos behave around other pets?

 

Although they may not warm to unknown humans, these lap dogs tend to be friendly with other dogs and pets.

 

If you want to take them to a dog park, you should find one that separates big pups from the little guys. Lhasa apsos won’t try to cause trouble, but they’re too little to play with the big pups.

 

Are they good around strangers?

 

In public, they are dignified and reserved, but they are engaging and sometimes funny in private. They aren’t fans of strangers, but they can be more accepting of new people with the proper socialization.

 

How to care for Lhasa apsos

What does a Lhasa apso’s coat look like?

They have a long, silky coat that usually reaches the floor. They shed minimally.

Lhasa apso coat colors:

  • White
  • Black
  • Black and tan
  • Grizzle
  • Red Gold
  • Red
  • Cream
  • Golden

 

There are other colors possible, but these are the ones accepted by the AKC.

Are Lhasa apsos hypoallergenic?

Yes, Lhasa apsos are considered hypoallergenic dogs because they don’t lose tons of hair or have a shedding season. People with allergies are sensitive to dander, which is dead skin cells similar to dandruff, and is attached to a pet’s hair follicles when they shed.

 

When dogs do not lose a lot of hair and dander that may cause a reaction for people with allergy sensitivities, they are thought of as hypoallergenic. Of course, there are no 100% hypoallergenic pets, only dogs and cats that shed less than others and therefore have the least impact on allergy sufferers.

 

 

How much grooming do Lhasa apsos need?

They need to be groomed daily so their fur doesn’t matt. Brushing and combing are both essential to keep their long coat free of tangles. Many Lhasa apso pet parents opt to bring their pup to a professional groomer.

 

What is the lifetime care cost of a Lhasa apso?

 

The lifetime care cost of a Lhasa apso is around $3600.

 

How to be the best pet parent for a Lhasa apso?

 

Here at Spot Pet Insurance, we want to help pet parents, both new and seasoned, reach their full pet parent potential.

We hope to provide you with the necessary information and coverage to help you and your pup live a full and happy life together. Lhasa apsos are fun and loyal little dogs, and they deserve and need a lot of care, especially when it comes to their grooming needs.

How much does a dog or puppy cost?

Adoption fee: $75-$1,200

[Expense: first year, following years]

Food: $240-$480, $240-$480

Water/food bowls: $10-$30, N/A

Collar and ID: $15-$25, $0-$25

Leashes: $5-$20, $0-$20

Dog bed and crate: $30-$50, N/A

Toys: $20-$60, $0-$60

Vaccines and routine care: $100-$1,300, $100-$400

Tick and flea prevention: $240, $240

Microchip: $30-$55, N/A

Brushes: $10, $0-$10

Grooming: $30-$640 (last figure is for professional grooming eight times a year), $0-$640

Total: $730-$2,910, $580-$1,875

 

Basic training and behavior etiquette for your dog

  1. Because Lhasa apsos are pretty stubborn and independent, they are pretty difficult to train. However, like most dogs, they need to learn basic commands. Other tricks might help keep them mentally stimulated.
  2. The best way to train one of these pups is to use the reward system. It might also help to make it into a game so that they will be more inclined to cooperate.
  3. If you avoid too much repetition, you might have a bit more success. You’ll need to be firm and consistent with the rules but flexible in how you teach them.
  4. They should be kept on a leash when outside. They like investigating, but you don’t want them to wander too far.

What type of foods should a Lhasa apso never eat?

Many foods are toxic to dogs, and there are also foods that they shouldn’t eat, even though they won’t hurt them. Although Lhasa apsos don’t have foods that could be toxic to their specific breeds, some Lhasas might be sensitive or allergic to some foods.

However, here are some foods your pup definitely should avoid.

  • Chocolate
  • Grapes and raisins
  • Avocados
  • Wild cherries
  • Rhubarb
  • Almonds
  • Yeast dough
  • Alcohol
  • Macadamia nuts

If you want to learn more about foods your pup can and cannot eat, check out some interesting articles here.

Exercising tips to keep your dog fit and healthy

 

These little pups should remain inside for the most part, and their outdoor exercise needs are fairly minimal. They can get most of their exercise from playing games in the house with you or your children if you have any, or from racing around the house.

 

However, it is a good idea to take them outside for a little bit every day. They need the mental activity of sniffing around outside and tracking scents. If you have a yard, you could let your Lhasa apso out there for supervised playtime.

 

They are pretty good at entertaining themselves when needed, but they’ll always appreciate you taking time out of your day to play games with them.

Lhasa Apso life stages

Puppy: 0-3 years

Adult: 3-7 years

Senior:  7+